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Wednesday, 11 July 2012

Jean Paul Gaultier: Resort and Menswear 2013.

Previously: Jean Paul Gaultier Couture: Dandies, Decadence, and George Sand.

A Jean Paul Gaultier triple-bill! I probably should've posted these first, as an aperitif to the high-end extravagance of the Couture collection last week, but I got too excited and forgot about them.
The Menswear and Resort collections had far more in common with each other than with the Couture show, both taking inspiration from two of Gaultier's favourite design themes: sailor suits and Indian fashion.


The main thing that impressed me about this collection was that it was so recognisably Gaultier without actually including any of the things that I traditionally think of as Gaultier -- corsetry, drag, and structured eveningwear. Gaultier isn't a designer that I associate with relaxation so it's honestly a bit of a disconnect to realise that he can put out a resort collection that looks wearable, comfortable, and interesting. With most big-name designers, resort collections either turn out looking too extravagant and couture-like (ie, Alexander McQueen) or are little more than high-street clothes with a designer label.
Maybe this is a no-brainer, but I really feel like Gaultier knows how handsome works. A significant proportion of all menswear shows include at least one tux, but Gaultier's slight edge of femininity in the cinch-waisted trousers and short jacket makes his tux stand out from the crowd.
I'm not sure what to think of the turbans. In Western womenswear there's a certain tradition of headwraps and turbans dating back to old Hollywood, but it seems somehow more daring for a man to wear a turban for non-religious purposes? Obviously people wear what they wear for any number of reasons, but I'm pretty sure that Gaultier's inspiration for this collection was explicitly Sikh. Maybe I'm just overly touchy about these things but when clothes have some religious connotation it always makes me a little uncomfortable when they get repurposed as "fashion".

I think these are... kilt shorts? Which sound kinda terrible on paper but turn out to look awesome. Instead of the flat front of a kilt, they split into shorts with a pleated skirt at the back and sailor-buttons at the front, in keeping with Gaultier's perpetual love of sailor suits.

I LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS OUTFIT. Black utilikilt? Awesome shoes? Gradated stripes? I wish more guys felt comfortable wearing kilts and skirt-like outfits because this is SUCH a good look.

Of course, it wouldn't be Gaultier if there wasn't a little silliness thrown in as well. When an outfit is made up of nothing but stripes, it's practically inevitable that you're going to end up looking like a mime. Or in this case, a turban-wearing sexy sailor mime. I'm sure someone can make it work.  Eugene Hutz, maybe?

7 comments:

  1. I know just what you mean about the turbans. Especially since Gaultier isn't (I presume??) in any way Indian or Sikh; it does feel AWFULLY culturally-appropriating. AND YET. They look so awesome with those looks. I normally find that shoving clothing items that are so clearly tied to a very specific culture into ordinary fashion is jarring and gimmicky, but it is really working here visually. I dunno. I guess I'll treat it as homage rather than offense until I hear some actual Sikhs saying they find it offensive? (Or until I hear that it's inherently offensive to appropriate the turban if you're not Sikh - I don't know if it's that kind of symbol of if it's more just in the "traditional wear" camp.)

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  2. Moncler crea un conflitto importante, perché vi sarà molto difficile cercare di non usare parole che ti fanno sembrare tutto ciò che interessa è la vendita. E ancora più importante, se i vostri sensi prospettiva si stanno concentrando sulla nomina o la vendita, che sarà immediatamente sulla difensiva.dfw

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  3. Moncler crea un conflitto importante, perché vi sarà molto difficile cercare di non usare parole che ti fanno sembrare tutto ciò che interessa è la vendita. E ancora più importante, se i vostri sensi prospettiva si stanno concentrando sulla nomina o la vendita, che sarà immediatamente sulla difensiva.z

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  4. That second-to-last shirt is amazing in terms of how it creates broad shoulders and a tapered waist on the wearer. I mean, the model probably has those anyway, but it would work well on most guys. Also, I loved the blue skirt (really voluminous pants?) on the final female photo. That looked so comfy...

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  5. There have been few forms of slavery worse than sex typing of clothing. Women in pants were called "patients" suffering from "permanent mental hallucination" (NY Times 5/27/1876) editorial "A Curious Disease." In June 1943 Chicago police arrested Evelyn Bross for wearing pants ("clothing not belonging to her sex") and a judge ordered her to see a psychiatrist for six months. That came to an end because during 1942-1945 women started wearing pants in wartime factories, and supporting the war effort was more important to the Feds than allowing psychiatry to keep perpetuating the myth that pants are "male." 68 years after the war ended, however, psychiatrists and psychologists still today successfully promote this equally rotten mythology that skirts are "female." If males were raised with the same clothing choices as women (a full range of "human" styles), we'd see far fewer female impersonators, because they really believe skirts/fancy clothes are female, and think they have to present as women to wear them.

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